by:

posted in:

December 18, 2012

IMG_0110

Do you have any thoughts on this post?

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

by:

posted in:

December 12, 2012

Wednesday Win: Throwback Photo Caption

For this week’s Wednesday Win, we’re using a throwback photo from Joel Webster, TRCP’s Center for Western Lands Director. Leave a comment and we’ll pick a winner on Friday, Dec. 14. The victor will receive a TRCP camo hat.

by:

posted in:

December 11, 2012

Tackling Fiscal Responsibility for the TRCP

Bob Hale
TRCP Financial Director Bob Hale makes sure that 82.2 percent of TRCP revenue goes to conservation programs.

It’s the end of the year, and a dozen holiday emails are likely waiting in your inbox.

This note is different.

I’m not going to try and pull your heartstrings or appeal to the policy experts out there.  You’ve seen other posts like that already.

I’m the director of finance at the TRCP and I’ve got a different perspective on how we fulfill our mission.  It’s my job to develop the annual budget, keep the organization fiscally responsible and run each year’s audit. As you have probably guessed, I’m a numbers guy.

My work here at the TRCP is vitally important. I want to share two of the TRCP’s accomplishments from the past year: The TRCP earned a spot in the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance and the GuideStar Seal of Accountability.

These two accolades show that the TRCP maintains the highest level of transparency and accountability among other businesses and  non-profits. We know that in order to gain trust and remain effective, the TRCP must focus on providing relevant and reliable information to our stakeholders in a way that is free from bias, comparable, understandable and focused on stakeholders’ legitimate needs.

All of us here at the TRCP work together to cut down costs and establish our credibility as a transparent and accountable organization. By displaying the Better Business Bureau and GuideStar seals on our website, we hope to show the public that we are proactive in ensuring the highest levels of fiscal responsibility.

Overhead costs such as rent, computer network, admin salaries and benefits comprise 17.8 percent of the budget.  That means that 82.2 percent of revenue goes to conservation programs directly related to our mission.

If you choose to donate to the TRCP, you can do so with the knowledge that your money will make a difference in helping us fulfill our mission of guaranteeing you a place to hunt and fish. I’ll make sure of it.

by:

posted in:

December 4, 2012

Wednesday Win: T.R.ivia

Theodore Roosevelt is the only person to have won the Medal of Honor AND which other prestigious award?

Photo courtesy of the Harvard College Library.

Send your answer to info@trcp.org or submit it on the TRCP Facebook page by Friday morning for your chance to win a TRCP hat.

by:

posted in:

Sportsmen: Too Early to Tell With Oil Shale

Oil shale is getting so much attention lately that it’s starting to feel like a cure-all pill for whatever ails us.

Need more energy? Have some oil shale.

Fiscal cliff got you down? How about a little oil shale?

The problem with this assessment is, fundamentally, we’re just not there yet. We have been hearing this same promise for decades. A viable commercial oil shale industry has yet to exist. And as we move forward, oil shale development needs to be done with considerable thought and caution.

Or so say the leaders from some of the nation’s most influential sportsmen’s groups, conservation organizations and scientific societies in a letter sent to Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar last week.

“Research must precede any commercial leasing,” the letter states, “and that research must demonstrate that extraction technologies and mitigation options exist that will protect clean air and water, conserve fish and wildlife, and sustain the economies that depend on those resources.”

To be clear, we are not saying oil shale is bad – the problem is it’s too early to tell. There are significant concerns still associated with oil shale development – concerns like   water supply, water quality and impacts to wildlife populations. They should not be taken lightly.

This is classic, “cart before the horse” type behavior – but it seems the BLM is working to right that situation. Its plan, released in early November, balances acres dedicated to oil shale research with protecting fish and wildlife habitat.

You can make a difference. Speak out on oil shale development today.

Here’s what sportsmen are saying: Go slow. Let’s do this right. Think clearly. Evaluate what we stand to gain against what we could lose. And if we get to a point where oil shale technology is viable and impacts are acceptable, then we can make decisions about when and where. But we’re not there just yet.

This post was written by  Shauna Sherard, communications director at Trout Unlimited and was originally posted on the Sportsmen for Responsible Energy Development blog.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

WHAT WILL FEWER HUNTERS MEAN FOR CONSERVATION?

The precipitous drop in hunter participation should be a call to action for all sportsmen and women, because it will have a significant ripple effect on key conservation funding models.

Learn More

You have Successfully Subscribed!

You have Successfully Subscribed!