Restoring the

Mississippi River Delta

Overview of the issue

Nearly 2,000 square miles of prime fish and wildlife habitat have vanished along Louisiana’s coast. The sea level is rising at the same time that the land is sinking and eroding, because sediment that was historically delivered by annual flooding on the Mississippi River has been cut off by flood-protection and navigation levees for a century.

Habitat conditions were made even worse in 2010, when the Deepwater Horizon suffered an explosion and sank, causing the largest oil spill ever to occur in U.S. waters. Reparation fees paid by BP, however, have created once-in-a-lifetime opportunities to restore Louisiana’s coastal wetlands and fish habitat and undo more than just oil spill damage. Watch our videos to learn how.

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Big speckled trout and more close to Mississippi River!

It’s a break in the Mississippi River that’s been wide open for almost a decade, and it’s still more controversial than figuring the best methods to combat the coronavirus. Some anglers love Mardi Gras Pass, and see its value to the ecosystem as a whole, but others simply despise it.

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Popular fishing spot delivers BIG-TIME!

Fishing conditions are sometimes ideal, and you feel extremely good about your chances before you ever leave the house. More commonly, however, something nags at the back of your mind, causing you to question whether you should have stayed in bed and continued dreaming about fish instead of braving the elements to try to actually catch them.

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Speckled trout, white trout every single cast!

Thanks to unseasonably warm temperatures, the annual migration of speckled trout from the outside spawning grounds to the inside feeding areas has been later and slower than usual. Some fish are in the marshes and interior lakes, but not yet in the numbers that are typical for this time of year.

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Gobs of speckled trout in sight of Mississippi River!

Specks are notorious for seeking out clear water, where they can use their razor-sharp eyes to feed, and in the summertime, they need salty water to complete their spawning mission.

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Redfish GOBBLE gummy worms!

Worms are appealing fare to only two main groups of earth-dwellers — birds and fish. So whoever decided to form gelatinous sugar into a confectionary resembling the most disgusting critters outside of Washington, D.C., was surely a sadist.

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Castin Cajun Pontchartrain Trout Fishing in New Orleans Part Two

Catching speckled trout and redfish and talking about freshwater and grass with the Castin’ Cajun Tony Fontenot and Capt. Mike Gallo in December 2017.

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Fishing the MR-GO on Castin' Cajun

Talking coastal restoration and flood protection and catching some specks and reds with the Castin’ Cajun in January 2016.

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Saving the Coast

The TRCP’s Chris Macaluso joins Pro Bass Angler Greg Hackney on Louisiana Sportsman TV in April 2018 to talk coastal restoration in the marshes near New Orleans.

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Chris Macaluso, Grass Beds in Louisiana - Louisiana Sportsman TV

Center for Marine Fisheries Director Chris Macaluso talks about the importance of grass beds for fishing in Louisiana and across the Gulf on Louisiana Sportsman TV in July 2014.

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