fbpx

by:

posted in: General

March 5, 2013

Mapping Project Brings on-the-Ground Results for Sportsmen

Montana sportsmen mapping prized areas of the state as part of the Sportsmen Values Mapping Project.

Involving the American sportsman in issues that affect our hunting and fishing heritage is fundamental to maintaining our outdoor heritage. Here at the TRCP we try and ensure sportsman involvement occurs at a level where impacts and results tend to be clear and immediate. To this end, the TRCP has developed a state-specific approach to capture input from local hunters and anglers called the Sportsmen Values Mapping Project.

As part of the project, TRCP staff members meet with sporting groups, conservation organizations and rod and gun clubs to identify “bread and butter” hunting and fishing areas in various states. You might wonder why anyone would reveal a favorite honey. When combined with critical habitat maps already in use by federal and state agencies, this information provides a powerful tool for politicians and decision-makers to use in public lands management.

The project’s goal is ensuring sportsmen are represented in management decisions by highlighting the exact areas they want to see managed for the continued and future use of hunting and fishing.

The success of the mapping project has earned recognition both at home and abroad and is largely held as a case study on how sportsmen can participate in land management and public policy. Recently, TRCP Center for Responsible Energy Development Director Ed Arnett gave a presentation about the project at the Conference on Wind Power and Environmental Impacts. The conference, held in Stockholm, Sweden, was attended by more than 300 people from at least 30 countries.

The TRCP’s Center for Responsible Energy Development Director, Ed Arnett. Photo courtesy of Mark Weaver.

During the presentation, Arnett highlighted the project as tool for wind energy developers and decision-makers to use in identifying key, high-use areas warranting special conservation strategies and in avoiding conflict with sportsmen and other stakeholders. As presented, the mapping project provides valuable and previously unavailable data that will aid in balancing energy development with the needs of fish, wildlife and sportsmen.

As Arnett returns from the international conference, he continues to ensure that decision-makers balance the needs of fish, wildlife and sportsmen with the impacts of land-use management decisions across all economic sectors to ensure a strong economy into the future. The TRCP Sportsmen Values Mapping Project is critically important to achieving that balance.

The project is expected to grow in the coming years.  In Wyoming, Western Outreach Director Neil Thagard will be returning to those communities that participated in the project to present results and develop opportunities for place-based, grassroots campaigns to protect areas important to sportsmen.  The TRCP plans to expand the mapping project to more western states in the near future.

Learn more about the Wyoming mapping Project.

Learn more about the Montana mapping Project.

Get involved today by signing up as a TRCP member.

One Response to “Mapping Project Brings on-the-Ground Results for Sportsmen”

  1. robert williams

    I feel that if we spent more of our time and money on educating the puplic that do not know about the problems looming up on all parts of wildlife hunting ,fishing and the invirement and alittle less onthe hunters and fishers and outdoorsmen that already know the problems and are working to fix as much as they can Big Bad Bob

Do you have any thoughts on this post?

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Comments must be under 1000 characters.

by:

posted in: General

You Talk, We Listen

Thanks for your interest and participation in the TRCP Livestream on Tuesday and congratulations to the winners of the “Gigantic Book of Hunting Stories.” We hope you enjoyed the chance to talk with us about key conservation issues in your community.

You can help us spread the word by posting this link (https://new.livestream.com/trcpchat/2013Priorities) on your Facebook timeline or by making a tax-deductible contribution toward our efforts to unite sportsmen on behalf of conservation.

If you missed it, you can watch a video of the event at Livestream.com. A few of the topics discussed include:

  • How hunters and anglers might feel the effects of the sequester
  • Prospects for the Sportsmen’s Act in the 2013 Congress
  • Update on the proposed Pebble Mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska
  • Tips for getting your voice heard in Congress

As these events expand, we hope you will continue to engage in and become informed about policy issues that are central to securing our nation’s outdoor heritage.

Watch the video below to find out how you can make a difference.

by:

posted in: General

March 1, 2013

Stemming the Tide of Wetland Loss

Whether you’re tangling with redfish in the Mississippi Delta, casting for bonefish in the Florida Keys or in a duck blind in North Dakota, America’s wetlands and waterways provide unrivaled fishing and hunting opportunities.

  • Coastal wetlands and the incalculable economic and ecological benefits they provide face significant threats from erosion, overdevelopment, invasive species, oil spills and climate change.
  • Across the farm belt, prairie pothole wetlands are being drained for intensive crop production. In some regions, up to 90 percent of these critical wetlands, often called the North American duck factory, already have been lost.
  • The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that 100,000 acres of wetlands are lost every year.
  • A first step in reversing the trend of wetland loss is to restore Clean Water Act protections to the potholes, marshes and tidal flats upon which fish, waterfowl and countless other species depend.
  • America’s hunting and angling heritage rests on our ability to conserve wetlands across the country.

by:

posted in: General

February 27, 2013

Wednesday Win: Fill in the Blank

Can you name the catalog that is featuring Mia?

Our Oregon Field Representative Mia Sheppard can be found on page 38 of ____________ Fishing Products. Name the catalog she’s featured in, and we will send you the first season of Steven Rinella’s “MeatEater.”

Send your answers to info@trcp.org or post a comment on the TRCP Blog by Friday.

 

by:

posted in: General

February 26, 2013

What Matters Most to Hunters and Anglers?

The TRCP has a simple mission. We strive to guarantee you a place to hunt and fish. Our work falls into three main categories:

  • strengthening laws, policies and practices affecting fish and wildlife conservation;
  • leading partnerships that provide a strong sportsmen’s voice in the decision-making process;
  • building consensus in the conservation community to advance policy solutions.

While our mission sounds simple, we often deal with complex issues. Laws, policies and decision making – the “insider baseball” that takes place on Capitol Hill can be hard for the average person to understand.

In an effort to put our work in tangible and applicable terms, we developed a “cheat sheet” for the everyday sportsman interested in conservation policy. The 2013 Sportsmen’s Conservation Priorities outlines the main areas where we at the TRCP will be focusing our work on behalf of hunters and anglers in 2013.

We’ll be hosting a live chat on Tuesday, March 5, to give you an opportunity to ask questions about the 2013 Sportsmen’s Conservation Priorities. Expect more information and a link to the video conference later this week. In the meantime, take a look and let us know what you think in the comments section below.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

CONSERVATION WORKS FOR AMERICA

As our nation rebounds from the COVID pandemic, policymakers are considering significant investments in infrastructure. Hunters and anglers see this as an opportunity to create conservation jobs, restore habitat, and boost fish and wildlife populations.

Learn More
Subscribe

You have Successfully Subscribed!

You have Successfully Subscribed!

You have Successfully Subscribed!

You have Successfully Subscribed!

You have Successfully Subscribed!