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October 23, 2012

Bud and Jim Range Fishing

Bud and Jim Range Fishing

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October 16, 2012

Billfish Conservation Act Passes Congress, Changing Commercial Harvesting Standards

By Jason Schratwieser, Conservation Director, International Game Fish Association

It’s been a long, slow road, but the Billfish Conservation Act of 2011 has been signed into law by the president. The new law prohibits the importation of marlin, sailfish and spearfish in the continental United States. It represents the culmination of nearly four years of sweat equity overcoming hurdles, roadblocks and naysayers.

The Billfish Conservation Act already is making waves around the world, with groups in other countries considering similar measures. Photo by Mac Stone.

The process began from concerns raised from members of the International Game Fish Association, a TRCP partner group, about the large quantities of marlin and sailfish that were being commercially harvested in Central America. For some time, IGFA also had periodically sent letters of opposition to restaurants and grocery stores known to serve or carry marlin and sailfish. However we didn’t really know how big the problem was until went looking.

In 2007 IGFA commissioned a report to investigate the global billfish market. We wanted to find out which countries were harvesting, exporting and importing the most billfish. What we found shocked us. With an average of 2.7 million pounds each year, the U.S. was squarely identified as the world’s biggest importer of billfish.

At that point it became clear that a reactive approach of writing letters to businesses selling billfish was not the answer. To tackle the problem IGFA partnered with the National Coalition for Marine Conservation to develop a proactive campaign to educate the American populace as to what billfish are, their imperiled status and their importance to ocean ecosystems.

The Take Marlin off the Menu campaign was successful in that several very prominent restaurants, grocery stores and even celebrity chefs decided to go “marlin free.” Interactive media polling also showed that the campaign was making an impact in consumers’ perceptions about importing, selling and consuming billfish. Still, we knew the only way we could get rid of America’s dubious distinction was to seek legislation that would end these practices outright.

In 2010 we were successful in introducing legislation in Congress that would ban the commercial harvest, sale and importation of billfish in the U.S. Our billfish report found that annual U.S. billfish market revenues (including harvest and sale from Hawaii) totaled a measly .07 percent of the entire U.S. commercial fishing industry. Nevertheless, Hawaii proved to be an unsurpassable obstacle in the bill’s progress.

By the time the next congressional session convened, we had a new strategy. In order to avoid the ire of commercial fishing interests in Hawaii, we created a carve-out that would exclude Hawaii and the Pacific Insular Territories. Billfish no longer would be able to be imported into the continental U.S., but Hawaii still would be able to harvest and sell billfish commercially. While not our ideal strategy, the strategy allowed us to reach our primary objective: ending the reign of the U.S. as the world’s largest importer of billfish. With the leadership of Sen. David Vitter of Louisiana and Rep. Jeff Miller of Florida, the Billfish Conservation Act of 2011 was introduced in the 112th Congress.

The successful progression of the bill did not come from one person, or one organization. It was made into a law with the help of other recreational fishing organizations including the American Sportfishing Association, Center for Coastal Conservation, Coastal Conservation Association, the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, Keep America Fishing, National Marine Manufacturers Association, and numerous other NGOs from the conservation community.

We felt that closing the U.S. to billfish imports would do two things: (1) close a sizeable piece of the international billfish market and (2) position the U.S. to take a more aggressive approach to international billfish management and conservation. The Billfish Conservation Act already is making waves around the world, with groups in other countries considering similar measures.

I suppose the old adage “change is slow” is true. But, it sure is sweet when it finally happens.

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October 9, 2012

Wednesday Win: Help Name the TRCP Blog

Help name the TRCP Blog and win the ultimate TRCP care package.

We launched the TRCP Blog back in June and we’ve heard lots of positive feedback from our partners in the conservation community. But now we’d like to hear from you.

We want to give the TRCP Blog a name worthy of its content and we want you to help select a new name.

Submit your ideas for a blog name on our Facebook page, tweet it to @theTRCP with the hashtag #TRCPBlog or e-mail us at info@trcp.org. The contest will be open from Wednesday, Oct. 10, to Wednesday, Oct. 17.  We will be narrowing down the suggested blog names and asking our partners to vote on the names they like best, then announcing the winner on Friday, Nov. 2.

If your blog name is chosen, we will send you the ultimate TRCP care package, including a TRCP Buck knife, a signed copy of Steven Rinella’s new book, “Meat Eater: Adventures from the Life of an American Hunter,” a TRCP hat and a Bully Bugger made exclusively for the TRCP. The first and second runners-up will receive TRCP hats.

Good luck!

P.S.  When brainstorming blog names, keep in mind our focus on all things Theodore Roosevelt, conservation, fish and wildlife.

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Colorado State Fish Swims in Only One Stream

Can you tell whether this is a greenback? Photo courtesy of ‘TRCP’s Native Trout Adventures.’

The greenback cutthroat trout, Colorado’s state fish, can be found only in a 4-mile span of Bear Creek, located southwest of Colorado Springs.

A recent study conducted by the University of Colorado delved into the genetics of the greenback cutthroat trout and found that many were mistaking the Colorado River cutthroat, Rio Grande cutthroat and others for the greenback.

The U.S. Forest Service is currently exploring options to conserve the greenback and creek upon which the fish depends. Meanwhile, TRCP partner Trout Unlimited is working to address trail impacts the Bear Creek area.

For any anglers out there thinking they caught a greenback only to learn later that they were mistaken, the TRCP feels your pain. Last summer, we shot an episode of “TRCP’s Native Trout Adventures” in which we mistakenly thought we were fishing for – and catching – greenback cutthroat trout in Pike National Forest near South Park, Colo.

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October 4, 2012

Roosevelt Wins!

After more than six years and 500 losses, the Theodore Roosevelt mascot finally won the Presidential Race at the Nationals’ baseball stadium in Washington, D.C., yesterday.

The Roosevelt mascot has lost every Presidential Race since 2006 when D.C.’s baseball team, the Nationals, began holding races among 10-foot-tall foam renderings of Theodore Roosevelt, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln at home games. Yesterday was T.R.’s time to shine. Check out the video below.

While in the political arena, T.R. succeeded in making conservation a top tier national issue. At a time of partisan gridlock in Washington, the TRCP continues working to keep Roosevelt’s legacy alive by fighting to conserve fish and wildlife and their habitats.

Show your support of our 26th president today by donating $5, $10, $25 or whatever you can afford to the TRCP!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

WHAT WILL FEWER HUNTERS MEAN FOR CONSERVATION?

The precipitous drop in hunter participation should be a call to action for all sportsmen and women, because it will have a significant ripple effect on key conservation funding models.

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