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posted in: General

October 18, 2013

Ocean Planning Makes Sense

Photo courtesy of Flyfishinsalt.com

This is being written on what was going to be “Black Thursday.” The day the idiots in DC wanted to see what might happen if the United States welched on its promise to pay. Don’t get me started on this subject. Needless to say, in their infinite wisdom, they have kicked the can down the road for a couple of months, so we can ruin the Holiday Season listening to their partisan bickering.

Despite this aberrant behavior, the process of trying to have some control over the development of our territorial oceans continues. I know that some in the recreational fishing industry think that “ocean planning” is part of the great conspiracy to totally eliminate extractive activities like recreational or commercial fishing. They feel that this process is simply “ocean zoning” intent on removing fishing. Maybe it is and I am just too naive to see it, but there are too many signs pointing in other directions. First, I don’t believe in the great conspiracy theory and secondly, I think that doing some real planning makes a whole lot of sense and I understand that in that process there will be winners and losers. The best description, IMO, of how ocean planning should work is found on Sea Plan’s, an independent ocean planning policy group, website: “Coastal and marine spatial planning (CMSP) aims to distribute and accommodate both traditional and emerging ocean activities to produce sustainable economic and social benefits while minimizing spatial conflicts and environmental impacts.  CMSP is an iterative process that uses the best available science along with stakeholder input to support integrated, adaptable, and forward-looking ocean management decision-making.”

The part of the process that I find objectionable is the building of more bureaucracy to complete this task. There are already agencies at the federal, regional and state level that deal with these issues. Do we need several layers of bureaucracy just to get these organizations to play in the sandbox together?

In any case, here in New England, we have the Northeast Regional Ocean Council (NROC), which appears to be a regional version of the National Ocean Council (NOC). However, it was organized by the NE Governors about 5 years prior to NOC, which was established under an Executive order from President Obama and likely the genesis of the anti-ocean planning movement. Many feel that this was merely an end run around the failed legislation called Oceans 21. Again, maybe it was, but that does not negate the need for some real thinking about how we use our oceans. Things such as renewable energy development, at sea LNG terminals, pipeline construction, ocean mining, etc, etc are going to happen. In comparison to those industries, fishing doesn’t stand a chance. We would be road kill on the developmental highway without some controlling structure.

While, I don’t happen to believe that it is enough, fishing does have some representation at the Northeast Regional Planning Body (RPB) level. This is through a representative from the New England Fishery Management Council sitting at the RPB table. Yes, fishing is just one voice among many, but without any representation, there would be no chance.

Recently, a coalition of marine interests including SeaPlan, representatives of the boating industry, New England states and the state of New York, U.S. Coast Guard, and NROC conducted a survey titled Northeast Recreational Boating Survey. This effort was designed to get stakeholder input on how boaters use the Northeast waters. It was a very comprehensive survey that got input from 12,000 participants. The survey shows the importance of boaters who generated $3.5 billion in economic activity. A much older survey conducted by the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA) indicated that 75% of all powerboats were used for fishing at some point. I don’t know if that holds true today, but it indicates fishing is still a substantial part of this economic engine. The take home message is that NROC is concerned about the recreational fishing industry and how it fits into the planning process.

I am also aware of efforts that are being taken to reach out to individual anglers to get their input into the process. These are being developed as this is written. NROC also has made an effort to include the party/charter fishing industry as well. If they had no interest in the fishing industry, I doubt they would make this level of effort to include stakeholder input.

While there are and will continue to be concerns about the whole Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) area, the idea that this is simply an underhanded plan to end all fishing just doesn’t carry any water (pun intended). As users we need to be involved with this type of planning and we need to try to make sure that our access to marine resources is not compromised.

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Ed Arnett

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50th Birthday Wish, Continued

Hey guys…

After tagging his first buck mule deer, I got my cousin Larry onto his first buck pronghorn. It was a very nice 14 x 14 1/2 inch long buck with nice mass, decent cutters and good sweep at the top. Mission accomplished! I got a small buck myself.

Sharing a great experience on a public lands hunt. Photo by Ed Arnett.

More later.  -ea

Ed Arnett

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posted in: General

October 17, 2013

50th Birthday Wish

A note from TRCP’s Ed Arnett:

Greetings all,

One of the things I really like about the TRCP family is sharing our great experiences on public lands hunting and fishing.

I’m down off the mountain for a day and wanted to share one of the more special moments in my life as a hunter.  This is my cousin, Larry Lanter and I after he took his very first buck and first mule deer on public lands in Wyoming.

Wyoming Muley
Sharing a great experience on a public lands hunt. Photo by Ed Arnett.

There are too many stories to tell, but there was snow, extreme mud, lots of hiking and a little drama at the end with an evening hit on the deer that yielded a tracking exercise this morning.

It took me two hours — often on my hands and knees looking for blood and the right tracks — to track him down, but we found him! He’s no monster wall-hanger, but a magnificent trophy for a first time mule deer hunter, and fair chase on public lands.

Larry and I are one month apart in age and both turned 50 this year (don’t look a day over 49 though now do we…) and this was our treat and wish for the half-century mark. My main goal was to get him a buck and I’m so happy as this is the first time he and I have hunted big game together.

I wanted to share the moment with my TRCP friends.  Also, notice our headgear. We’re promoting as we tour Wyoming!  Now we’re off to hunt pronghorn.

More later,

ea

 

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posted in: General

October 9, 2013

The Missing Colorado River

Last week I wrote about a fascinating new river mapping tool from the U.S. Geological Survey called Streamer. Over at the National Geographic blog, Jennifer Pitt of the Environmental Defense Fund points out one problem with the tool – it doesn’t recognize that rivers cross country borders. Case in point: Streamer cuts off the Colorado River at the border with Mexico. Thinking that the border is the limit of a country’s responsibility, she argues, leads to poor management of the river.

Read her blog in full here.

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posted in: General

October 8, 2013

Seven Major Sportsmen’s Groups Call on Congress to End Shutdown

Seven major sportsmen’s groups from across the country hosted a teleconference calling on Congress to end the shutdown that has closed hundreds of wildlife refuges, Forest Service and BLM areas at the start of hunting seasons across the nation. Leaders from the sportsman-conservation community urged Congress and the administration to make habitat conservation efforts a priority.

The shutdown is limiting hunting opportunities and is hurting the country’s wildlife-related recreation economy, which in 2011 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimated at more than $144 billion. For instance, the shutdown closed more than 329 federal wildlife refuges for hunting, and more than 271 are shut to fishing, affecting local economies.

These closures compound the cuts proposed by Congress to programs that conserve wildlife habitat, such as the Land and Water Conservation Fund, the North American Wetlands Conservation Act and others. The shutdown also undermines efforts to reauthorize the Farm Bill, which includes critical elements of national conservation policy.

Find out how the federal shutdown is affecting sportsmen and -women. Featuring top leaders and experts in the sportsman-conservation community including:

  • Dr. Steve Williams, President, Wildlife Management Institute and former Director of the U. S. + Fish and Wildlife Service (Pennsylvania)
  • Land Tawney, Executive Director, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers (Montana)
  • Whit Fosburgh, President/CEO, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership (Washington, D.C.)
  • Gaspar Perricone, Co-Director, Bull Moose Sportsmen’s Alliance (Colorado)
  • Miles Moretti, President/CEO, Mule Deer Foundation (Utah)
  • Howard Vincent, President & CEO, Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever (Minnesota)
  • Desirée Sorenson-Groves, Vice President, Government Affairs, National Wildlife Refuge Association (Washington, D.C.)

Listen to the telepresser and let us know how you are seeing the effects of the government shutdown.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

CONSERVATION WORKS FOR AMERICA

As our nation rebounds from the COVID pandemic, policymakers are considering significant investments in infrastructure. Hunters and anglers see this as an opportunity to create conservation jobs, restore habitat, and boost fish and wildlife populations.

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