January 18, 2011

It Is Not the Critic Who Counts

“It is not the critic who counts: not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming, but who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself for a worthy cause; who, at the best, knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.”

Theodore Roosevelt
Speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, April 23, 1910

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It Is Not the Critic Who Counts

“It is not the critic who counts: not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming, but who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself for a worthy cause; who, at the best, knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.”

Theodore Roosevelt
Speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, April 23, 1910

November 18, 2010

T.R. on the Democracy of Wilderness

Photo courtesy of Library of Congress.

From its very nature, the life of a hunter is evanescent; and when it has vanished there can be no real substitute in old settled countries. Shooting in a private game preserve is but a dismal parody; the manliest and healthiest features of the sport are lost with the change of conditions. We need, in the interest of the community at large; a rigid system of game laws rigidly enforced, and it is not only admissible, but one may also say necessary, to establish, under the control of the State, great national forest reserves, which shall also be breeding grounds and nurseries for wild game; but I should much regret to see grow up in this country a system of large private game preserves, kept for the enjoyment of the very rich. One of the chief attractions of the life of the wilderness is its rugged and stalwart democracy; there every man stands for what he actually is, and can show himself to be. -Theodore Roosevelt

October 18, 2010

Celebrate Theodore Roosevelt’s Birthday by Supporting the TRCP

Deerskin suit, rifle in hand. Photo courtesy of USNPS.

Born Oct. 27, 1858, Theodore Roosevelt created enough federal wildlife reservations, national game preserves, national forests, national parks and national monuments in his lifetime to conserve 234 million acres of wild America.

A man of deep convictions and above all a man of action, Roosevelt had the foresight to take on the issues still so significant to sportsmen today, understanding that if we want to ensure that critical fish and wildlife habitat, special hunting grounds and secret fishing holes will be around for future generations, we must act now.

In the spirit of T.R., on this, his 152nd birthday, take action on the conservation issues that matter the most to you. The TRCP is working every day to sustain our nation’s irreplaceable outdoor heritage. Your help can guarantee that all Americans have access to high-quality places to hunt and fish – now and forever.

Support the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership today.

September 18, 2010

Roosevelt on the Pleasure (and Pain) of Wily White-tails

White-tail deer are very canny, and know perfectly well what threatens danger and what does not. … We were reluctant to molest them, but one day, having performed our usual weekly or fortnightly feat of eating up about everything there was in the house, it was determined that two deer (for it was late in autumn and they were then well grown) should be sacrificed. Accordingly one of us sallied out, but found that the sacrifice was not to be consummated so easily, for the should-be victims appeared to distinguish perfectly well between a mere passer-by, whom they regarded with absolute indifference, and anyone who harbored sinister designs. They kept such a sharp look-out, and made off so rapidly if any one tried to approach them, that on two evenings the appointed hunter returned empty-handed, and by the third someone else had brought in a couple of black-tail. After that no necessity arose for molesting the two “tame deer,” for whose sound common-sense we had all acquired a greatly increased respect.

– Excerpt from Theodore Roosevelt on Hunting

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