THE TIME TO ACT IS NOW.

The Antiquities Act of 1906 was signed into law by Theodore Roosevelt and has been used by 16 presidents over the last 110 years—eight Democrats and eight Republicans—to protect some of the nation’s best public lands. In recent years, sportsmen and women have advocated for the responsible use of the Antiquities Act to protect some of America’s finest hunting and fishing areas, including Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks in New Mexico, Katahdin Woods and Waters in Maine, and Berryessa Snow Mountain in California. An Executive Order signed by President Trump required a DOI review of 27 different national monuments (22 of which allow hunting and fishing) covering 11.3 million acres. That review has been completed, and Secretary Zinke will deliver a report to President Trump on August 24. There is still time to let Zinke know that monuments matter to sportsmen and women.

 

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We suggest using the following talking points in your comments:
    • I ask that you reject any steps to rescind or shrink any national monument. Executive branch actions to reverse or otherwise undermine a single monument would jeopardize all monuments and undermine the legacy of Theodore Roosevelt.

    • Sportsmen and women have advocated for the responsible use of the Antiquities Act to protect some of America’s finest hunting and fishing areas, including Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks in New Mexico, Katahdin Woods and Waters in Maine, and Berryessa Snow Mountain in California. These and other areas were protected, in large part, because of support from the sportsmen’s community and they are being managed to sustain the traditions of hunting and fishing.

    • Access to hunting and fishing is crucial, and I request that you make assurances for recreational hunting and fishing on public-lands monuments. Further, in marine monuments, I support actions to increase opportunities for recreational fishing and I ask that you actively support the study, restoration, and management of fish and wildlife populations within all monuments.

    • Instead of considering changes to existing national monuments, I ask that you seek to set an example for how the Antiquities Act should be used responsibly so that all future Administrations may follow in your footsteps. Sportsmen and women have set an exemplary model for the creation of new monuments that is worthy of your consideration and endorsement.

Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument. Image courtesy of Elliotsville Plantation, Inc.

Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument. Image courtesy of the BLM flickr.

Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument. Image courtesy of the BLM-flickr.

Río Grande del Norte National Monument. Image courtesy of the BLM flickr.

Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument. Image courtesy of Bob Wick, BLM

Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument. Image courtesy of David Soules.ion, Inc.

Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument. Image courtesy of BLM Flicker.

Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument. Image courtesy of Elliotsville Plantation, Inc.

WHY MONUMENTS MATTER TO SPORTSMEN

The foresight of early sportsmen-conservationists has allowed hunters and anglers to protect lands that otherwise would have been left vulnerable to development. These lands are important to sportsmen for conserving high-quality fish and wildlife habitat and valuable hunting and fishing. In fact, in April the leaders of the TRCP, National Wildlife Federation, Trout Unlimited, American Fly Fishing Trade Association, and Backcountry Hunters & Anglers sent a letter to President Trump highlighting the importance of national monuments to Sportsmen.
READ THE SPORTSMEN’S REPORT ON NATIONAL MONUMENTS