April 16, 2013

Featured Conservation Leader: Mike Simpson

Rep. Mike Simpson of Idaho is dedicated to the conservation of our natural resources both today and into the future. Simpson took some time to answer a few questions for the TRCP.

The TRCP is set to honor Simpson at the 2013 Capital Conservation Awards Dinner held April 18.

How did you become passionate about the outdoors?

Like most people, I became passionate about the outdoors because of my family. My father had a profound love for the outdoors, hunting, fishing and for Idaho’s natural beauty. He instilled that passion in my brother and me. I have carried that passion with throughout my life – and into my service in Congress.

What is a favorite memory of a trip afield?

My favorite memories of outdoor trips involve my favorite memories of outdoor trips involve family vacations to Redfish Lake.  To this day, I love returning to that lake, enjoying its natural beauty and basking in the memories that are so important to me and my family.

To this day, I make it a priority to join the Idaho Conservation League each summer in Redfish Lake and engage in dialogue about the importance of protecting Idaho’s outdoor heritage.

Photo by Dona Cox/Idaho Fish and Game.

What is your go-to piece of hunting or fishing gear?

The hunting-related possessions I treasure most are the rifles and shotguns passed down to me by my father. I also cherish his wildlife mounts which are now on display in my Washington, D.C. office.

What led you to a career in Congress?

I never set out to be a member of Congress. I ran for the Blackfoot City Council hoping to serve a community that had been very good to me and my family. I chose to run for the State Legislature and eventually for Congress because of the opportunity each office provided for serving the people of Idaho.

I’m not sure anyone knows what they are signing up for when they run for Congress, but it has been among the greatest honors of my life. Serving Idaho in Congress allows me an opportunity to work every day on the issues that are most important to the people and the state I love.

What role do you see sportsmen playing in the conservation arena?

Sportsmen play a critical role in the conservation community because they are arguably the most diverse subset. Sportsmen and -women know firsthand the value of the collaborative process that holds the greatest promise for finding long-term solutions to conservation challenges.

What are some ways sportsmen can become involved in public policy?

Sportsmen can go individually or in groups to meet with their elected officials and impress upon them the importance of their cause. They can also work through the many conservation organizations dedicated to impacting public policy and advancing the cause of sportsmen.

It is critical that sportsmen and -women take the time and get involved in the public policy arena at the local, state and federal levels and make sure that politicians clearly understand the size and passion of the sporting coalition that exists in this country.

What do you think are the most important issues facing sportsmen today, and how do you hope your work in Congress will resolve these issues?

The federal budget crisis is the single most important issue facing everyone who has interests in Congress – including sportsmen. The need to reduce federal spending naturally puts pressure on many of the programs most important to the sporting community. These include the Land and Water Conservation Fund, the North American Wetlands Conservation Program, the Conservation Reserve Program and many others.

I am working to preserve these programs because I understand their importance, not only to our nation today, but to future generations.

In the simplest terms, why do you care about conservation?

Countries throughout history that have ignored or betrayed their natural treasures have always come to regret such decisions. I greatly respect the cultural, artistic, historical and natural diversity of our nation and believe we are duty bound to protect it and pass it on to future generations.

Any conservation leaders or heroes you look up to?

Idaho Senator Jim McClure had a significant impact on my view of conservation and collaboration. Senator McClure was a conservative republican, Chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee and icon to Idaho’s ranchers, loggers, miners and multiple-use advocates.

He was a leader who understood the value of natural landscapes, was a strong supporter of sportsmen and -women, and believed strongly in the importance of collaboration and dialogue in advancing public policy.

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September 11, 2012

TRCP Supporter Wins Signature Buck Knife

The signature TRCP Buck knife won by Matt Dunlap.

Here at the TRCP, we want to learn how best to serve the hunting and angling community and further the TRCP’s mission of guaranteeing all Americans a quality place to hunt and fish. In order to facilitate our mission, we asked sportsmen to complete a survey about issues they value most.

As an added incentive, the TRCP gave away a signature TRCP Buck knife to a randomly selected survey respondent. Matt Dunlap of Lincoln, Neb., was the lucky recipient.  Matt is a law student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. We were able to catch up with him in between classes to chat about his interest in conservation.

How did you first become interested in the outdoors?

Matt: My dad got me into the outdoors when I was really young. He took me out hunting with him when I was about 5. I also fished since I was really young.

Do you have a favorite place to hunt or fish?

Matt: Every year I go duck hunting at the Nebraska Sandhills. It’s a place I look forward to going back to every year. Right now we’re hoping for some more water in Nebraska so the ducks can land.

I also do a lot of fly fishing in Colorado. I usually go near Vail or to the Conejos River in southern Colorado.

What are you currently doing?

Matt: I recently graduated from Northwestern University. Right now I’m attending law school at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. I’m not exactly sure what kind of law I want to practice. I’m interested in environmental, but that could change.

What do you think the most important conservation issues are facing sportsmen today?

Matt: Habitat conservation in general is a pretty big deal – making sure we keep the numbers up. I’m also a big supporter of public access. The recent Colorado roadless rule is a big deal to me because I do a lot of backpacking and fishing in the rugged parts of Colorado.

Where are you planning to put your new commemorative Buck knife?

Matt: I’m putting it on top of my dresser. That’s where it is right now.

TRCP supporter Matt Dunlap talks about hunting, fishing and conservation issues that matter to him.

July 31, 2012

Featured Conservation Leader: Kim Rhode

Olympic skeet shooter Kim Rhode talks with the TRCP about shooting, hunting and her Olympic experiences. Photo courtesy of americanrifleman.org.

Kim Rhode is a double trap and skeet shooter who made her debut in the 1996 Olympics where, at the age of 16, she became the youngest female gold medalist in the history of Olympic shooting. Since then she has medaled in the 2000, 2004, 2008 and 2012 Olympics. Earlier this year, Kim took some time to speak with the TRCP about shooting, hunting and her Olympic experiences.

What are some of your earliest experiences with shooting?

Kim: Shooting has been passed down from generation-to-generation in my family. My grandfather was a hounds-man and an avid outdoorsman. He taught my dad, my dad taught my mom and they eventually taught me.

So you were a hunter before you ever tried skeet, trap and sporting clays?

Kim: Oh yes! I was into hunting prior to any competition. I hunted birds, deer, bear; I even went on a hunting trip to Africa. I’ve always been very active in the outdoors. I also love fishing for trout, salmon and steelhead.

Growing up we were very active. Those are some of the best memories of mine. Sitting around the campfire with my grandfathers and uncles telling hunting stories like, ‘the deer was THIS big!’ It was just fantastic. I hope to share my passion for the outdoors with my kids one day.

What was the first gun you ever shot and what are you shooting now?

Kim: Wow, I don’t even remember the first gun I ever shot. I know that when I first started competing I was using a Remington 1100 youth model. Then I went to a Perazzi.

I was so small at the time that I had a hard time getting any type of gas-operated gun to fit me. They were always too big and I was fighting the gun. The fit of your gun is something that’s so important in shooting.

What’s your favorite thing to hunt?

Kim: I have to say some of the bigger game but bird hunting is awesome too. It is super fun and exciting, especially when I get to go out with my family and friends.

I would imagine there aren’t many missed birds…

Kim: Well anyone who says they don’t miss is a liar. Everybody misses; the trick is to not miss when it counts the most.

What are some of your views on conservation?

Kim: Living here in Los Angeles, there are so many people who are completely out of touch with the outdoors. They just don’t go out and appreciate the beauty that’s out there. They spend so much time on the computer or watching television that they totally miss looking around and taking in the beauty and splendor of nature. One issue I see with our youth today is the technology factor, trying to get them off the games and get them outside.

It’s really important that children understand the heritage and the conservation side of things because it goes hand in hand with hunting and the outdoors. Hunting is about tradition and passing something on just as much as it is about land management and conservation.

Can you tell us what it’s like to win a medal at the Olympics?

Kim: It’s really about the journey. It’s not about the gold, the silver, the bronze or anything like that. Of course that is a fantastic part of it but when you’re standing on the podium, watching the American flag go to the top of the pole, you aren’t thinking about the medal. You are thinking about all the experiences that got you there. The journey is what keeps me going back – overcoming obstacles, succeeding when people say you can’t and representing your country. It’s such an honor. I’m so blessed.

May 26, 2012

Erica M. Stock

Image Courtesy Erica Stock.

Current location: Denver, Colo.

A self-proclaimed “native trout freak” Erica Stock has been working in the conservation arena for more than 10 years. Erica got her start on the water in Oregon where she fell in love with salmonids. She currently resides in Colorado with her daughter, Portland, and husband, Tim. When she’s not out bow hunting or fly fishing, Erica spends her time rallying for native trout restoration and habitat conservation projects throughout the west.

What are you up to right now?

I like to joke that I have two full-time jobs. I’m working as the outreach director for Colorado Trout Unlimited and the director of strategic partnerships for the Western Native Trout Initiative.

Why are you so passionate about native trout?

Native trout are majestic fish. Each one is distinct and beautiful. Once they are gone you can’t go into a lab, re-create them and put them back in a river somewhere.

Native fish have been reduced to such a small fraction of their historical range that some species have been lost all together. It would be a shame to see this trend continue, but, given all the threats faced by native trout, it is a very real possibility.

That’s where groups like WNTI and TU come in. Both of these organizations have been integral in uniting the community and developing the National Fish Habitat Action Plans. These plans give us a glimmer of hope.

Tell us a little bit about National Fish Habitat Action Plans.

These plans encourage collaboration between different state agencies, federal agencies, local partners and non-profit organizations that have an interest in fish conservation and management. These plans allow for much more progress than if all these groups were working separately.

Prior to the establishment of these plans, there was so much fragmentation and inefficiency. Everyone was out doing what they thought were the top priorities – using their own science or no science at all. NFHAPs provide a game plan so individuals and groups can work together toward the common goal of rebuilding some of these fish populations.

Tell us about what you do for TU.

I work with our grassroots; Trout Unlimited has 23 chapters and 10,000 individual members in Colorado. I work with these partners on some great native trout projects and projects that benefit local communities directly – regardless of whether there are native trout involved.

How did you get into fishing?

I was on the Deschutes River in northwestern Oregon doing invasive plant removal. We were just getting off the river for the day when I decided to pick up my friend’s fly rod. It was on an Orvis four-piece rod. I was immediately hooked.

What are some of the greatest threats faced by fish populations?

There are 15 native trout for which WNTI works. Seven of these are threatened and the remainder are species of concern. Development has degraded important habitat for a long period of time. The introduction of non-native species like rainbow and brown trout has caused serious competition between native and non-native species. These non-native fish will hybridize with the natives, destroying their genetic purity.

Climate change is another big threat to native trout. We need to make sure these fish are going to have habitat as the climate shifts. Fortunately these fish are in headwaters and roadless areas on public lands – and that’s no coincidence. The best hunting and fishing are found in roadless areas. We need to be sure these areas remain pristine and relatively untouched.

Check out “TRCP’s Native Trout Adventures,” a video series featuring native trout fishing expeditions in spectacular landscapes across the Rocky Mountain West.

Learn more about the Western Native Trout Initiative.

May 15, 2012

Dan, Jeff and Pat Vermillion

Growing up on the banks of the Yellowstone River in the trout-crazy town of Billings, Mont., Dan, Jeff and Pat Vermillion were primed for a life chasing salmonids with fly rods.
All three have decades of experience guiding in exotic locations about which most anglers can only dream. In 1995, Dan, the oldest of the Vermillion boys, abandoned his career as a lawyer to join his brothers and a small group of guides to form Sweetwater Travel, a fly fishing travel company specializing in delivering anglers to some of the world’s greatest waters.

Throughout the quest, which included countless exploratory trips that often resulted in dead ends, the Vermillion brothers recognized the need to be active in conserving the natural resources upon which their fishing operations rely. Whether advancing the Taimen Conservation Fund, formed by Sweetwater Travel to conserve Taimen populations in Mongolia, or working in British Columbia to prevent overfishing of steelhead, Dan, Jeff and Pat Vermillion are dedicated conservationists who take nothing for granted.

Dan, Jeff and Pat Vermillion. Photo courtesy Sweetwater Travel.

Dan Vermillion: “When you are lucky enough to make your living off of the bountiful natural resources that are found in places that are yet to be overly disturbed by a human presence, you feel a responsibility to keep those opportunities alive for generations in the future.”

One of the perks of being a fly fishing guide is the chance to meet some extraordinary people. In 2009 on his way to vacation in Yellowstone National Park, President Barack Obama stopped for a float trip down the East Gallatin River. Dan Vermillion served as his guide. Dan was presented with the rare opportunity to spend several hours fishing with the president of the United States – with no cameras or media present.

Were you able to do a little lobbying on behalf of sportsmen?

Dan Vermillion: “I didn’t really have to. Several times during the day we talked about water rights, we talked about water flows. He told me very clearly that he didn’t grow up hunting and fishing but that it is really important that we continue those traditions in the U.S. He said the key to those traditions lasting is caring for the resources that provide us with the ability to hunt and fish.”

Do you think he was genuine?

Dan Vermillion: “I do. I came away from my time with him feeling that he was the most genuine politician I have ever met, besides maybe Jon Tester. And I’ve met a lot of them.”

Dan and President Obama celebrating after hooking a trout. Photo courtesy whitehouse.gov.

What do you see as the biggest threats to hunting, fishing and conservation?

Dan Vermillion: “I see two threats. The big threat, of course, is just the onward march of human beings to every corner of the planet. Unfortunately, whenever human beings seem to interact with a lot of these places that produce quality recreational opportunities for hunting and fishing, the hunting and fishing species tend to not do too well. But the reason that it is consistently allowed to happen is that the people that love to hunt and fish, with exceptions, of course, don’t tend to make decisions in the rest of their lives that are reflective of their dedication to hunting and fishing. They’ll go out and support politicians or they’ll support certain policies that ultimately undercut their ability to have quality hunting and fishing opportunities in their backyards; but they never put two and two together.”

The most pressing conservation issue in which the Vermillions have become engaged is the proposed Pebble Mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska. Sweetwater Travel owns two lodges in Alaska that lie on either side of the proposed mine. Last month, Dan and Pat were among 40 sportsmen leaders from 17 states participating in a trip to Washington, D.C., to press Congress and the Obama administration to protect Bristol Bay and its unrivaled salmon fishery from the proposed Pebble Mine.

“Obviously it’s a potential threat to the businesses, but that’s not the main reason we’re backing this up,” said Pat Vermillion. “We’re backing this up more for the potential damage to the salmon runs.” The sportsmen delivered a letter to the Obama administration from more than 500 hunting and angling groups around the country who want the EPA to take action under the Clean Water Act to conserve Bristol Bay.

Dan Vermillion: “I think that Pebble Mine fly-in was one of the most impressive groups of people I’ve ever been around. As a group, we presented a compelling message, and that message was that Bristol Bay is far too important, not just to fishermen and hunters of the world, but also the native communities that live and have lived there for thousands of years. There’s no justification whatsoever for an open pit mine to be put smack dab in the middle of the last significant large sockeye salmon run.”

Pat Vermillion: “Pebble is something that will go through unless people are active and actively try and stop it. It’s way too big of a deposit. If people don’t stand up and get active and push, the mine is definitely going to happen. That’s what makes it such a compelling cause and one that needs to be recognized on a national basis.”

Dan Vermillion: “We took our message to the Hill, and I don’t think any of them felt that strongly that this mine has to go forward. And I think the same thing is true with Lisa Jackson, the head of the EPA. Something she said really struck me, and I may not have it quite right. To paraphrase, she said that this discussion is not about always having the opportunity to fish for and experience the wild sockeye runs of Bristol Bay, but it’s about always having the ability to dream about going up there someday. Of critical importance is the simple fact that it’s out there and that makes our world a better place to live.” Learn more about the Vermillion brothers.Learn more about Save Bristol Bay.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

WHAT WILL FEWER HUNTERS MEAN FOR CONSERVATION?

The precipitous drop in hunter participation should be a call to action for all sportsmen and women, because it will have a significant ripple effect on key conservation funding models.

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