February 19, 2013

North American Model of Wildlife Conservation

Thanks to the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, America’s hunting and fishing resources are characterized by a unique system of management.

  • Hunting and fishing in North America, and the management of our wildlife and fisheries, are characterized by a unique and successful system of management called the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation.
  • Underlying principles behind the North American Model include the ideas that 1) wildlife is owned by the public, 2) wildlife can be killed only for legitimate purposes and 3) the management of our wildlife resources should be accomplished through science-based management.
  • The model is a concept that distinguishes the U.S. and Canada from many other nations where the opportunities to hunt are restricted to those who have special status, such as land ownership, wealth or other privilege.

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February 17, 2013

Small Game and Hunting Access

Small game hunting has a special place in the hearts of hunters and is the perfect platform from which to introduce people to hunting, ethics and the outdoors.

  • For most of America’s history, gaining access to hunting grounds has been as easy as a knocking on a landowner’s door, but with public access declining, it becomes harder to get kids hunting.
  • Hunters and anglers contribute $7.4 billion a year in taxes and fees and help to fund some of the most important conservation work.
  • Programs such as the Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentives Program have been short-changed by Congress, and with the Farm Bill still not signed, states have had to put access programs on hold.

February 13, 2013

Wednesday Win: T.R.ivia

Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress.

In honor of Valentine’s Day, we’re recognizing our favorite sweethearts in this week’s Wednesday Win. What was the name and location of the church where Theodore Roosevelt and his second wife, Edith, were married?

Leave us a comment on the TRCP Blog, or email your answers to info@trcp.org by Friday for your chance to win a copy of the first season of the Sportsmen Channel’s “MeatEater” featuring Steven Rinella.

February 12, 2013

Feral Pigs and the Impacts of Invasive Species

Steven addresses the widespread problems created by exotic and invasive wild pig populations across the United States and how hunters are engaged in the effort to solve the problem.

  • Feral pigs destroy native plant communities by their rooting and trampling, reducing forage and altering habitat for native fish and wildlife species important to sportsmen.
  • Feral pigs out-compete native wildlife for food and other valuable resources, spread parasites and diseases, and substantially decrease water quality.
  • The only long-term solution to many of these problems is reducing pig population’s size and range.

Public Lands Yield Iconic Game and Pristine Backcountry

This past August, I had the opportunity to hunt deer with archery equipment in central Nevada. This would be my first Nevada mule deer tag and I was able to hunt in a pristine backcountry area with abundant deer and little hunting pressure. I was blessed to have the opportunity to hunt this iconic animal in such a spectacular setting.

One reason Nevada consistently provides outstanding opportunities for hunting and fishing are the large areas of intact and undeveloped backcountry on Bureau of Land Management lands. Most people don’t realize it, but just over 86 percent of the land in Nevada is public land. It is these large intact areas of backcountry land that provide the core habitat that gives us some of the finest big game hunting in the West where trophy mule deer, elk, antelope and bighorn sheep are taken every season.

Large intact areas of backcountry land provide the core habitat that gives us some of the finest big game hunting in the West. Photo by Dusan Smetana.

Unfortunately, throughout the West some of our best public lands are threatened by a massive wave of new energy development and deteriorating habitat conditions. Here in Nevada, poorly planned wind energy projects and transmission lines could threaten to further fragment prime fish and wildlife habitat. In other parts of the West, oil and gas developments are being proposed in some of the best remaining big game habitat.

As development pressures continue to grow, the TRCP and partners are working to maintain the high quality fish and wildlife values of our public lands. Western hunters and anglers are working through local land use plans in Colorado, Nevada and Oregon to conserve intact fish and wildlife habitat and are calling on the BLM to manage high value areas as backcountry conservation areas or BCAs.

BCAs would provide BLM land managers with clear guidelines that would help conserve our best wildlife habitat while protecting public access and at the same time would allow common-sense activities to restore habitat and honor existing rights like ranching.

Learn how you can help conserve backcountry and hunting and fishing heritage today.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

WHAT WILL FEWER HUNTERS MEAN FOR CONSERVATION?

The precipitous drop in hunter participation should be a call to action for all sportsmen and women, because it will have a significant ripple effect on key conservation funding models.

Learn More
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